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NutraCleanse™: Food or Natural Health Product?

With a product like NutraCleanse™, it’s easy to see why some may assume we’re classified as a natural health product. Our product is healthy, natural, wholesome, and its ingredients are extremely beneficial to our customers’ health.

However, there are some factors about our product that don’t meet the definition of what Canada considers a natural health product (NHP).

We’re a Gourmet Food Product, Not a Natural Health Product

Under the classification of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, NutraCleanse™ is defined as a food, not an NHP:

“The term “food” (definition) is defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). Natural health products (definition), which are a subset of drugs, are defined and regulated under the Natural Health Products Regulations (NHPR). These definitions are central to determining the correct classification of a product (i.e. food or NHP) and consequently whether the food or NHP regulatory framework applies.” #1

 

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is the governing body responsible for compliance and enforcement of regulations and requirements related to food, while Health Canada carries out this role for Natural Health Products.

Health Canada (Natural Health Products)

It is Health Canada’s responsibility to determine product classification, and Health Canada takes the following four factors into consideration when determining the classification of a product:

  • Product format
  • Product composition
  • Perception of history and use
  • Product representation

“NHPs that have been authorized for sale by Health Canada bear a Natural Product Number (NPN) or Homeopathic Medicine Number (DIN-HM) on the label. These numbers are indications that the product is classified as a NHP and falls under Health Canada‘s responsibility.” NutraCleanse™ was determined not to need one of these numbers, and therefore consumers will not find one on our packaging.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (Food)

The main difference between food and NHPs, is how they’re represented. If the label of a product claims to solve a health issue, then it’s considered a drug. Although NutraCleanse™ is extremely beneficial to many areas of health, such as being an excellent mild laxative, lowering blood sugar, and aiding in weight loss, we don’t make those claims on our packing, because our consumers know by looking at our product that it’s composed of mostly flax, and flax will help with the above afflictions.

It’s like kale: kale could come packaged with a health claim to add more fibre (therefore helping people with constipation), or be full of readily-absorbable antioxidants (thereby decreasing levels of free radicals and having an anti-cancer effect), but it doesn’t need to. People know it’s healthy, and its packaging (or lack-thereof) does not need to claim anything.

It’s the same with NutraCleanse™.  We don’t need a number, because it’s obvious what’s in our product, and there are only 5 ingredients. We’re not a natural health product; our product is food. Whole, gluten-free, healthy, nutritious food. And that’s it.

We’re not trying to be something we’re not—we’re simple, and simply healthy. To learn more about what products need NHP classification and an associated Natural Product Number (NPN) or Homeopathic Medicine Number (DIN-HM) on their labels, see the video below.


References:

#1: Canadian Food Inspection Agency